A complete electrical map of the brain explains the principle of memorization
A complete electrical map of the brain explains the principle of memorization

A complete electrical map of the brain explains the principle of memorization

Полная электрическая карта мозга объясняет принцип запоминания Neuroscientists from the University of Pennsylvania for the first time compiled the most complete map of the electrical connections observed in the human brain. Data was obtained from nearly three hundred patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain. Scientists are confident that this information will help them in the further development of effective technologies of electrostimulation that improve memory. The work done illustrates how various areas of the brain interact during cognitive processes, such as memory formation. Researchers, some of whom are parts of the Active Memory Recovery (RAM) project, noted that low-frequency brain activity rhythms are responsible for the connection of the anterior, temporal, and middle temporal lobes involved in memory processing. Until that time, studies on the relationship between different parts of the brain were mostly carried out by non-invasive methods, such as MRI. However, the most accurate information about large-scale networks in the brain can only be obtained with operations on the brain itself. Полная электрическая карта мозга объясняет принцип запоминания Information has been collected from various US hospitals over several years to compile a single electrical brain map of the brain. Patients of neurosurgical departments who had electrodes implanted in the brain were offered various memory tests: they had to memorize words from the monitor and then repeat how much they could remember. At the same time, researchers studied brain activity. As a result, it was found that when a person memorizes new information (a set of words), the simultaneous work of brain areas is strengthened by slow waves of activity and weakens at high frequencies. Leading author of the article, Ethan Solomon, specified that the increase in neural activity in a certain place resembles the low-frequency connection of brain regions. That is, in order for the memories to form, first it is necessary to give a stimulus to each part of the brain, and then begin to interact between each other at low frequencies. Much work remains to be done, but if successful, neuroscientists expect to develop an effective method of therapeutic brain stimulation for patients with memory disorders (brain injury, Alzheimer’s, etc.). In turn, we note that the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is actively involved in financing this study.

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