From January 1, 2016, Russians will receive the right to oblivion
From January 1, 2016, Russians will receive the right to oblivion

From January 1, 2016, Russians will receive the right to oblivion

From January 1, 2016, Russians will receive the right to oblivion The law on the “right to oblivion”, which provoked a wave of conflicting opinions in Russian society, will nevertheless come into force on January 1, 2016 – on July 14, 2015, the President of Russia signed his bill. Thus, starting from the new year, Russians will be able to require Internet search engines to remove links that lead to false or outdated information about them. Search engines required verification of the accuracy and relevance of the information. To remove links, you will need to send an official statement, indicate your personal data and a link that the applicant does not want to show to the public. In 10 days, the search engine will have to make a decision. If the network resource does not fulfill the user’s requirements within the framework established by law, then the citizen will be able to go to court at the place of residence or Roskomnadzor. The Russian deputies who developed the document note that it is directed against bullying on the Internet. Internet companies are outraged by the law and stated that it violates the rights of citizens to access information and is contrary to the public interest. For example, a senior official can remove information about his past crime from public access. A similar regulatory document works in Europe, where Google received over 282 thousand requests to remove a million links in a year. About 41.3% of applications were satisfied.

Add comment