Japanese refuse centralized energy networks
Japanese refuse centralized energy networks

Japanese refuse centralized energy networks

Японцы отказываются от централизованных энергосетей For Japanese cities, tsunamis with earthquakes are not uncommon. Because of this, some of them were forced to switch to micro-energy networks, receiving electricity from renewable sources of local scale. Unlike giant counterparts, miniature systems can function successfully, even if the centralized electricity supply is cut off in all environs. The northern settlement, Higashimatsushima, was in the forefront. In the early spring of 2001, tremors with a tsunami destroyed three quarters of the city’s structures, and most importantly, killed more than a thousand people. The state allocated funds to the city for restoration. But the locals decided not to splurge on the old energy system. Instead, all forty thousand citizens chose to build miniature power grids. At the same time, the pure electricity production system was decentralized. Now a quarter of the city’s electricity is produced absolutely autonomously – you don’t need to connect to the common energy system. If the city is completely de-energized, local technologies will provide citizens with electricity for three days. An example of Higashimatsushima turned out to be contagious in other regions with settlements. Distributed independent miniature power grids everywhere continue to function even after the power supply is cut off throughout the district. To obtain energy in these cases, wind installations, solar stations, natural gas sources are used. The state finances innovative projects in the energy sector. For this, the Japanese authorities created a rehabilitation program. This year alone, her budget reached 3.72 trillion yen, or 33.32 billion dollars. All of them will go on the construction of smart distribution energy systems throughout the country. In the coming year, they want to increase the budget by almost a quarter. Японцы отказываются от централизованных энергосетей Soon, the whole country can completely move away from centralized energy systems by switching to small networks of local scale. Takao Kashiwagi, a professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and one of the authors of the technology described, assures that the day is near when large power plants will stop building unnecessary. They will be completely replaced by energy mini-systems distributed throughout the country.

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